About Us

The Texas Board of Professional Geoscientists (TBPG) was created in 2001 by Senate Bill 405 in the 77th Legislature. Senate Bill 405, also known as the Texas Geoscience Practice Act, became Texas Occupations Code 1002. Officially becoming effective on September 1, 2003, TOC 1002 is the governing statute by which the TBPG operates. The Texas Geoscience Practice Act is the basis for all agency rules, policies and procedures. The TBPG is governed by a nine-member Board, all appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate. The Board consists of six Professional Geoscientists and three public members, which serve staggered six-year terms.

What is Geoscience?

Geoscience is the science of the earth and its origin and history, the investigation of the earth’s environment and its constituent soils, rocks, minerals, fossil fuels, solids, and fluids, and the study of the natural and introduced agents, forces, and processes that cause changes in and on the earth.

Geology is the study of the origin, composition, structure, and history of the earth and its constituent soils, rocks, minerals, fossil fuels, solids, fluids and gases, and the study of the natural and introduced agents, forces, and processes that cause changes in and on the earth. There are many subdivisions of geology, which may include historical geology, physical geology, economic geology, mineralogy, paleontology, structural geology, mining geology, petroleum geology, physiography, geomorphology, geochemistry, hydrogeology, petrography, petrology, volcanology, stratigraphic geology, engineering geology, and environmental geology.

Geophysics refers to the study of the physical earth by means of measuring its natural and induced fields of force, including, but not limited to, electric, gravity and magnetic, and its responses to natural and induced energy or forces, the interpretation of these measurements, applied with judgment to benefit or protect the public.

Soil Science is the study of soils, their classification, origin and history, the investigation of physical, chemical, morphological, and biological characteristics of the soil including its ability to produce vegetation and the fate and movement of physical, chemical and biological contaminants.

Why is Licensure Important?

“Much of today’s geological practice impacts engineered works, the health, safety, and welfare of the public, and the environment…. Inadequate and incompetent practice by a geologist can cause loss of life or property and can be expensive because of the need to redo work. Licensure by individual states helps provide protection for the public by establishing minimum standards in the discipline that individuals wishing to practice must meet and maintain.”

Quote from John W. Williams, Professor and Chair, Dept. of Geology, San Jose State University, Past President of the National Association of State Boards of Geology, Past President of the Association of Engineering Geologists, excerpt taken from GSA Today, June 2001.
© Copyright 2013-2017 - TBPG (Texas Board of Professional Geoscientists)